The Brexit prophecies

By Jon Morgan

In the lead up to the Brexit referendum, several Christian groups claimed that the Bible predicted a Leave vote, including many Christadelphians. When the Leave vote succeeded, they were quick to claim this trivial prediction as a stunning validation of the complete Bible message and a sign of impending Armageddon. However, while Brexit still seems likely to happen in some form, this year has seen it throw the UK parliamentary process into chaos, with no clear end in sight.

While I don’t think scripture makes any statement on Brexit, I do think this saga has some important lessons about Bible prophecy interpretation that stretch far beyond Brexit. It’s all here: A crystal-ball gazing seer, Armageddon, even a reference to my favourite fiction from last year. Some of it is mocking, but I don’t apologise - if Christadelphians didn’t want that, they should have chosen something better than Brexit to nail their colours to the mast over.

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24 comments:

  1. If Boris wins next Thursday and starts the brexit process, I'm sure most CDs will be whipped into a frenzy as they listen to triumphant lectures about how accurately the events of the world are panning out.
    But at the same time, their older failed prophecies will be quietly swept under the carpet and ignored as they focus on this latest development.

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    1. Mark,
      I see that as a good thing, elderly christadelpphians (80%+ of UK Christadelhians are over 60) crowing about brexit success while living off their fat pension pots, and declaring Jesus to be back "within a generation", will only have the effect of further distancing themselves from the young people that they already fail to attract.
      CD families are split by the brexit issue already, and those in their thirties and early forties are ever less likely to wish to lead what has become a band of aggressive and deluded pensioners.
      I'll make a prediction now. In 25 years time, 90% of Christadelphians alive today will be dead.....

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  2. Jon,
    Could you share the link for that picture of the banner holders? I seem to recall that this was a stunt organised by "bibleinthenews", who at the time linked a video showing the two grinning poster holders being more interested in their smartphones than spreading the gospel. I'm sure it was at some sort of recent brexit rally in London, but I've had a look on the site and can't find it now. I recall being surprised that Christadelphians had actually got involved in a political event.

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  3. Joseph, I saw it on the ex-CD Facebook group, and it was part of the protests on the original Brexit date (29 March). It can be seen in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pykn3_J99pc (around the 2:21 mark), and also referenced, as you say, in a Bible in the News podcast at http://www.bibleinthenews.com/Podcasts/648. I'm sure I saw other CD sources discussing it at the time, but can't find the links.

    Like you, I was surprised by Christadelphians being involved in a political event.

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    1. Thanks Jon, that's the one. I could not recall the date, I was searching a bit too recently. Yes, one of leading Christadelphian Crank Matt Davies efforts. Matt is part of Nottingham Forest Road, which no surprise is also registered as a charity, so could just possibly be using tax relief to make political statement such as this.

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  4. Well, the Conservatives won the election conclusively, like they were expected to, and so I saw another excited post about how Brexit was paving the way for Armageddon (though it seems to have since been deleted).

    My conclusion remains the same: The Bible didn't prophesy Brexit, and so, whether Brexit happens or not, it does nothing to establish the truth of the Bible.

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  5. I reiterate my own thinking that Ex-Christadelphianism is not a position that you should take, but rather it is a journey you undertake to escape the religion. It should be a temporary phase in your life. It should be a healing process. But you will never heal if you keep picking at the psychological wounds inflicted on you by the Christadelphians. You have to get them out of your life and out of your mind completely. Worrying about Christadelphian Brexit and all their other tosh is not healthy. Try to get yourself to the state of mind where you can mentally resign from the Ex-Christadelphians and move on, without giving this religion another thought. Swim in the ocean of reason and rational thinking and don't be tempted back into the dank Christadelphian swamp of Brexit, Gog and all of the other nonsense that blighted our lives for so long. Get over it. Erase the Christadelphians from your mind and delete this website from your favourites. They are doing a fantastic job here, but think of this website as a hospital. Once they have got you mentally well, thank them, leave, and never return, or you will not fully recover.

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    1. Hello John.
      Good advice, but it`s not easy to achieve. So many little reminders. Even driving past a CD meeting hall, taking a pinch of bread between the fingers from a breadboard, and some of us do meet with Christadelphian friends. Doesn`t stop me from being relieved to be out, but the reminders are for ever?

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    2. John, any reader is of course welcome to read as little or as much as they like, and has the freedom to choose any life path they wish free of the constraints Christadelphian teachings and practice places on them. That is what I have done, after all - writing about religion is just one part of a life far more varied than my Christadelphian life was. While I only post articles here that I think have valid critiques of Christadelphians or might be useful to ex-Christadelphians, anyone is welcome to check out the rest of my posts to see the balance. Analysing and recovering from religion is a significant component of my blog (the religion was a significant part of my first 25 - 30 years), but it's not everything.

      I've said before, I don't think the gold standard is having zero contact with Christadelphia, particularly for those like me with family and friend connections they wish to maintain. I think a much more important standard is whether it controls me, and I can fairly confidently say now it doesn't control me, at all. I hope that posts like this can be useful to others, but a big part of them is for me. Writing things out in exhaustive and sometimes exhausting detail helps me better understand my former beliefs, and then makes it possible for me to confidently dismiss them. Hence their having no control over me. Freedom from that control is showed in being able to question, deconstruct and mock teachings that were once so important to me.

      Religion is a very human endeavour, and tells us all kinds of interesting things about humans. It can be frustrating, or entertaining, or tragic, or fascinating.

      In trying to understand more about religion in general, not just my former religion, I have been able to understand myself better, to understand the world better, and along the way have made some great friends (most but not all ex-Christians) with whom I discuss all kinds of things (not just religion).  It wasn't what I set out to do or expected to do when leaving Christadelphia, but it works for me.

      Fast forward five or ten years, and I probably hope that I wouldn't have the need to write as much about religion as I do now. But I also hope that I would still be in close contact with my family, many of whom will probably still be Christadelphian.

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    3. I have long left the thrall of christadelphia behind, but still have close family and friends who are deeply involved with them. I visit here now and again, not to pick at old wounds, but because I am fascinated by the willingness of intelligent people to accept the teachings of an ancient collection of fables. Members of my own family have their minds fuddled and their lives stagnated by their lifelong indoctrination. Unable to see beyond the echo chamber they inhabit, they live in hope of a fantasy world that will never arrive.
      I find it baffling that otherwise normal adults with all the comforts and knowledge that the 21st century can provide are so gullible.

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  6. Wasnt predicited to be a landslide victory.Polls are not 100% Gospel always.

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    1. The combination of the way the First Past the Post voting system was expected to work and the general Brexit landscape meant that the Conservatives were more likely to get a majority, and as a result that Brexit was more likely to happen in some form. That's not certainties, just probabilities.

      But the bottom line is still that Brexit has nothing to do with Bible prophecy.

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    2. Paul, of course polls are not 100%, that is why we have elections. Polls are so we can get an idea of what is going on before we go to bed, it makes for better TV!
      What on earth do you mean by "Gospel always"? Some religious nonsense?

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    3. It took a matter of hours before Christadelphians were off on their usual prophecy babble other the election result. It may have been wiser for them to look at what went wrong for the party that resoundingly lost and see if they could learn anything from that.
      The leader was old, had ideas and policies from 35 years ago, and believed that these same policies would appeal to those not even born 35 years ago.
      The policies were formed by a small group that did not represent the country as a whole, but rather had been put into place by those already sympathetic to their ideas.
      The policies were heavily promoted to, and mostly believed by young people with little life experience, who lived inside a social media bubble of reinforcement, with little ability to evaluate other alternative realities.
      They had policies and plans that those outside their bubble described as "wish lists", a health service without funding limits, reduced working hours, free broadband, new houses, new boilers,taking money off the rich, all free! (sounds like an earthly version of the Kingdom), not surprisingly, few believed them. Few believe the Christadelphians either.

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    4. Which is just what Christ actally predicted would be the case.
      "For many are called FEW chosen".

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    5. Ex. Christadelphian, have you ever wondered how many different small denominations with conflicting interpretations of the Bible quote the "many called, few chosen" verse?

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    6. Ex.Christadelphian, since you are "Ex.Christadelphian", is it safe to assume that you were not chosen?

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    7. At the time when those words were spoken/written, the "chosen" sect was a tiny minority, and so in that light it is surely no surprise for them to "predict" their own situation at the time. No religious writer (as far as I am aware) ever claimed that their own religion was not the correct one. They all instead wanted everyone to believe theirs was special and unique.

      It is a fact that the vast majority of religious sects will not survive and of those that do, most will remain a minority. Thus the prediction that only a "few" would be chosen seems unimpressive since that is the most likely outcome for any sect. If the sect disappears, well then there is no one to remember the quotation so there is no issue there either.

      It is actually far more difficult (and less likely) for someone to predict that their sect will NOT be the few. The odds are stacked well against it, especially the longer time goes on.

      But the real interesting thing is, as Jon mentioned, how every denomination applies those same verses to themselves. I'm sure even the not-so-small denominations have their own interpretation for why such verses still apply to them.

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  7. I don't think any of us really know either way..100%.

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  8. Just using slang for polls being 100%. You didnt get my slang.

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    1. No worries Paul. I get it now. Keep contributing.

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  9. Think we will butt heads eventually..but too bad.. will do!😉

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  10. I suspect the Christadelphian excitement over Brexit is inversely proportional to the number of their predictions they actually expect will come true. Their reaction smacks of something along the lines of "wow, we got one right!" - and that's on an event with only 2 possible outcomes.

    I agree with Jon. The Bible never predicted Britain would join the EU, nor did it predict Britain would leave. I also agree further that the Bible never predicted the EU either.

    But for those Christadelphians who see Brexit as a sign of an almighty, intelligent god slowly working out its perfect plan for humanity, I can only assume we're not looking at the same unfolding of events.

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  11. Just a post election, post holiday season update. UK Christadelphians are once again promoting the beliefs of Jim Cowie with regard to Brexit, and specifically, how the actual vote was not really a vote at all. They are repeating the previously stated belief that because the vote was running close, God specifically sent rain over from continental Europe, to ensure that 2 million southern UK voters could not vote remain.
    My conclusion is that since this has now been repeated several times in presentations, that it is now held to be a correct belief. I have to say that as a lifelong resident of the UK, some bad weather did not strike me as odd in any way, it's just the normal thing here, however, since this belief has never to my knowledge been challenged by Christadelphians, I now accept that forms part of their religious beliefs.
    Likewise, the same talk (referenced below) clarifies the Christadelphian belief, stated regularly, that we are only a "generation" away from the return of Christ. In fact Jim Cowie makes it clear that for various reasons, as we have now left Europe, The raising of the dead/return of Christ/Armageddon will occur in 2030. I actually found it difficult to understand what was predicted for 2030 (please watch from 23:30 and let me have your thoughts). I'm not 100% certain if Christ is back in 2030, with Armageddon in 2040?
    What I am expecting to see now that this has been clarified, is some considerable changes in how Christadelphians live their lives, I'm expecting to see pension pots being emptied and houses and businesses sold,holidays cancelled etc, and a real focus on spreading this truth throughout the world, 24/7/365. I also expect the young adults in my former family to abandon ideas of higher education (since it will be pointless, Jesus will be back within a few short years of them qualifying), and concentrating instead on the religion, with the brethren and sisters supporting them in this work.
    I am genuinely surprised that the Christadelphians have taken these things onboard as facts, because I have heard that some UK Ecclesias are as split down the middle on the issue as the general population, with some quite senior members very unhappy at the stance taken.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLKhXxRQIYE

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